Tag Archives: Food

From Dominica – Jacoway Inn, Part 3

Overlooking the Gardens below from the top floor balcony.

Overlooking the Gardens below from the top floor balcony.

The Jacoway Inn, Dominica : Storming Back To Business, Part 3

The day before Cat 5 Hurricane Maria hit Dominica on the night of September 17th 2017, views from the lovely gardens of Jacoway Inn were somewhat restricted by the tall hedges of shrubs and trees, providing shade and privacy.

This changed overnight, and now eight months later the property boundaries of bright oranges, yellows and greens of tall crotons are regrown. Before long, overlooking the surrounding banana gardens and the few neighbouring homes will only be possible from the upper floors of the Inn.
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From Dominica : Jacoway Inn, part 2

Jacoway Inn Gazebo

The Gazebo

The Jacoway Inn, Dominica : Storming Back To Business, Part 2

Inland, behind the bayside village of Calibishie resides the main part of a very international community along the several spectacular ridges and valleys which lead down to the beach and bay. New, architecturally designed expensive homes are dotted along the ridge summits amongst banana gardens, grazing cattle, and borderless, family smallholdings, enjoying panoramic views to the village below and the Atlantic beyond.

Up here, the hurricane blasted trees take their time to grow new branches, but on the ground, good husbandry has ensured that all the massive, dead branches have been cleared away and recycled elsewhere. Continue reading

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From Dominica: Jacoway Inn, part 1

Red Rock beach at Calibishie

Red Rock beach at Calibishie

The Jacoway Inn, Dominica : Storming Back To Business

The deep blue Atlantic Ocean gleams under a hot Caribbean sun. The cool, sweet tradewinds blow a cleansing breeze into the beachfront mainstreet of Calibishie adding to the recuperative sense of regeneration found throughout the lower village and the surrounding community in the hills behind.

It is late May, and eight months after catastrophic Category 5 Hurricane Maria dealt a mighty blow to Dominica, and this northern seaside village of Calibishie seems to be showing the rest of the island how to ‘get over it’ and get back to the business!
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Caribbean Christmas Sweet Delights

Caribbean Christmas Sweet Delights

turkish-caribbean-delight

Caribbean Christmas Sweet Delights – Caribish Delight

Turkish delight is one of our family Christmas favourites and its very hard to find in Dominica, or indeed in many of the islands. So sticking to my principles of trying to create recipes using as much of what we grow on our Caribbean property as possible, I have made a thinly disguised Turkish Delight with a mystery twist from my garden and called it Caribish Delight.

Naturally it did’nt stop there, and so we now have an interesting selection of Christmas Sweets to offer visitors dropping in.

Gelatine is readily available locally as a gelling agent, so I used that to set my sweets, although there maybe better alternatives elsewhere.

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5 Steps to Starting a Small Tropical Vegetable Garden

5 Steps to Starting a Small Tropical Vegetable Garden

Vegetables grown at a Dominican home.

Vegetables grown at a Dominican home.

If you are living in the tropical Caribbean, you may be interested in taking full advantage and try your hand at living off the land. A tropical environment is very conducive to growing your own fresh foods, and there are so many benefits to growing your own food (better nutrition, lower cost, etc).

Fruits tend to grow more successfully in this part of the world, however, you can also have a great deal of luck growing your own vegetables. Read on to find out useful tips for growing your own vegetable patch in the Caribbean.
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A Miraculous Experience – The Miracle of Miracle Fruit!

The Miracle Fruit

Yesterday I had the privilege of not only witnessing a miracle but actually participating in one! No, I did not levitate, walk on water or turn water into wine…but I did manage to get an extremely sour orange to taste like a sugar coated candy. How? Well the miracle was Miracle Fruit.

Miracle Fruit (Synsepalum dulcificum) is a small red berry that is native to West Africa esta web but grows well in most tropical regions.

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After sucking on the pulpy seed for about a minute your taste buds are dramatically transformed so that everything that was once sour or bitter tastes extremely sweet and delicious.
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Amaranth – Healthy, Easy and Delicious

Amaranth; locally known as wild spinach or zepina

In the Caribbean, you may have noticed that if you burn the bush and dried grass in your yard, what you usually see after a few weeks is a wild weed. Often this weed is actually a commonly available vegetable – wild spinach.

Wild spinach can be found almost anywhere because it is extremely adaptable to adverse growing conditions. It is a great addition to have in your vegetable plot as it will even grow just from sticking a branch into the soil, I know because I have tried it. I myself have become very fond of this vegetable because it is so easy to grow, needs very little care, and has so many ways in which it can be cooked.
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Eat Local and Get Farming – Solutions to the Global Food Crisis

Solutions to the Global Food Crisis

Food shortages and increasing hunger are making news all over the world. As small islands, we in the Caribbean rely on many imported products. However as fuel costs rise, it forces up the price of these goods and shortages in global production mean that we definitely need to think seriously about making the most of locally available goods.

I’ve been doing an informal assessment of my daily diet to see what proportion is local versus the amount is from overseas. Overall I’ve been doing pretty well anyway but this simple analysis has shifted some habits. For instance, I realized that breakfast I was eating a lot of oats with dried fruits all of which are imported, so even though I still enjoy an occasional bowl of oats porridge I have instead been eating breakfasts of plantain and salad with home-made fruit juices and cocoa tea. To further experiment with local ingredients I recently made green banana porridge too which was interesting. It’s not really a substitute for the oats but a new flavour that adds variety and makes an alternative use of this local staple.
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